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Friday, September 13, 2013

Frugal Travel Accessory: Prescription Bottles!

We're helping Miss Em get ready for her year-long stay in Serbia. More to the point: we are watching Miss Em, world's most organized and least procrastinating person, put the final touches on her packing. Mr FS contributes a family tip for travel. It's the ultimate in frugality, since it's FREE.

Do not throw out those orange plastic prescription bottles. They make great travel companions. The tops are secure. Obviously, you can take your vitamins in them. But Mr. FS realized a while back that you could take greasy stuff in them, such as my beloved petroleum jelly, great for lip balm and general dry skin relief.

A few years ago, we refined the idea. Mr FS packed instant coffee in one. That way, we could have our caffeine fix on the road. (We carried a small empty water bottle to effect the alchemical process).

Now Miss Em is taking the idea a step further, with PEANUT BUTTER!

It's so nice when you are en route or in a new place to have a little something to pick you up, especially when you are unsure of the currency or the language. Poor Frugal Son arrived in his new home in France with a growling tummy and a single granola bar: all the stores were closed on Saturday night and would remain closed on Sunday. Who wants to explore in a state of exhaustion and/or hunger? Coffee and peanut butter: what could be better?

7 comments:

Janice Riggs said...

I have one of those bottles, full of quarters, in my bag all the time. While in Chicago proper we don't have to feed parking meters, it often happens when we're in the suburbs. And people OFTEN need coins to take the bus - I always have them!

Best of luck to your daughter - I'm so excited for her!

SewingLibrarian said...

I saved the tiny plastic container that houses Ear Planes. I put my next day's thyroid pill in it by my bedside with a glass of water. No lost pill in the morning. (I use this when traveling. At home I have a nice little china box for my thyroid pill.)

Shelley said...

Well, this is a novel idea for sure! I'm at a slight disadvantage as my prescriptions don't come in those sorts of bottles, but I have used film canisters from back in the dark ages for various things like pills and change. Not sure but I think PNB would have to go into a liquids bag for security and I find I'm challenged to get all my make up and various toiletries into those, as I try to fly with carry on luggage only. I can see this as being an alternative to carrying a candy bar or nuts or fruit in a bag for emergencies. Does one carry a spoon or wooden spatula to eat the PNB with?

Just returned from 6 weeks in France - 3 weeks at cousin's flat in Nice, cat-sitting; 3 weeks in motor home in Loire Valley. We take staples in the RV and buy at markets but food in France is generally more expensive than here in Britain. The most frugal thing I did was probably carrying a bottle of water in my backpack.

Duchesse said...

So, does she carry multiple single doses? Very wise to travel with a stash of a full days' supply of calories, in some form. (Mine is energy bars.)

Bon voyage, Miss Em!

SewingLibrarian said...

I think Shelley might be right about the peanut butter being considered a liquid by TSA. Miss Em might want to check that on the TSA website.

KayoticSewing said...

Fantastic idea about prescrioption bottles. We don't get those in Canada but I'm going to look out for similar bottles to carry small supplies of almost-instant food.

Homemade baked/no bake energy bars made of nutbutter/oatmeal etc are my staples while travelling. Larabars come in handy too.

Frugal Scholar said...

@Janice--You are a genius! Now we have one in the car--thanks.

@Sewing--A great idea! I'm always losing pills on my nightstand. Thanks.

@Shelley--a plastic spoon. We carry a bottle for water too--also in the USA.

@Duchesse--As many as will fit in the bag. She's having quite an adventure.

@Sewing--The amounts are tiny--so well under 3 oz for liquids.

@Kayotic--Great name. I had no idea that the orange bottles weren't universal. Would that we had your health plan, btw.