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Sunday, June 14, 2009

What You Need to Know: Sunscreen with Paula Begoun

I just read the New Yorker article on health care costs that everyone is talking about. I feel my left-of-center heart start beating faster. Sooooooo. Let's move on to a healthcare issue everyone can agree on: sunscreen.

I have been getting my info on sunscreen from Paula Begoun's website. From Paula I learned, years ago, about the need to protect against UVA AND UVB rays. From Paula, I also learned that SPF just needs to be at 15 or above. Contrary to what many think, SPF 30 does not provide twice as much protection as 15.

A few years ago, I was talking to a colleague who had had skin cancer. I asked if her dermatologist had told her about the need for titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, or avobenzone (parsol) for full-spectrum protection. No, her dermatologist had only told her to get a high SPF. I looked at her sunscreen and, indeed, it did not have the critical ingredients. I gave her my sunscreen.

Now this information has made it to the mainstream press. And, when I look at sunscreen ingredients, I see more of the appropriate ingredients (there are others in addition to those I mentioned available now).

So, below, is a recent Paula Begoun report. You too can sign up for her free emails. Word of warning: Paula now makes her own skincare products. For many, this crosses the line. I have bought a few of her products and found them to be excellent. But she recommends other lines as well, both from the drugstore and from specialty stores. In the frugal department: it is good to know that there are excellent options among drugstore brands. And, needless to say, skin cancer is NOT a frugal choice!


This is long, but worth reading.

Summer Sunscreen Exclusive

Protecting skin from the sun has become an intense controversy for two major reasons. Number one is our basic need for vitamin D, which is produced by the skin's exposure to sun, meaning that it may be problematic to limit exposure or by some opinions, use sunscreen at all. Number two concerns sunscreens and the types of active ingredients used to create the SPF (Sun Protection Factor) rating which might have unwanted systemic consequences.

I know, just when you thought you had the sun protection concept down solid a curve ball comes straight across home plate!

Controversy aside, when it comes to skin, what is absolutely, 1000% certain is that the sun is a potent carcinogen and sun damage is by the far the most significant cause of wrinkling, skin "aging", and skin cancers.
Get Naked!

Aside from abundant studies proving how damaging sun exposure is to skin, you can do your own research by taking a test; I call it the "get naked test of aging". In other words, just compare the areas of your body that rarely, if ever, see the sun with the parts of your body exposed to the sun on a daily basis. If you are over the age of 30 you will notice the areas that get minimal sun exposure (such as your backside, inside of your arm, breasts, middle back, and thighs) don't appear dry, flaky, thin, show brown discolorations, have wrinkles, or any of the other signs of "aging". Meanwhile, skin chronically exposed to the sun without protection looks "older" and has more skin problems than skin that hasn't been exposed to the sun or hasn't been protected in some manner.
This report is to help you protect your skin from the negative impact the sun has on skin! For details on the other controversies surrounding sun protection click through to these links:

* Vitamin D and Sun Exposure
* Nanotechnology & Mineral Sunscreens
* Can Sunscreen Ingredient Affect Skin Negatively?

Summer Shopping Sanity

Now that longer days and warmer weather is settling in, the other obvious signs of the season are also brightly shining in news stories about sun protection, fashion magazines filled with ads for sunscreens, self-tanners, bronzers, and drugstore shelves lined with all manner of sun-care products. You would think there was no daylight any other time of the year!

The fact that sunscreen tends to be promoted seasonally doesn't do much to reinforce the need for every day protection, 365 days a year. Yet sun damage is about naked skin seeing daylight, and sun damage begins within the first minute that skin is exposed to the sun.
Sunburn Surprise

Recently, I've even seen some drugstores set up sunburn stations, where all manner of products (many of which contain irritants) sold to relieve the sting and redness of sunburn are promoted. Of course, the goal is to avoid sunburn but, as it turns out, getting sunburned is surprisingly common. Based on the most recent statistics from the United States Centers for Disease Control, 1 in 3 adults said they got a sun burn in the last year. Now that's bad news.

Even worse, 2/3 of adults who suffered sunburn admitted to enduring several sunburns in the past year. But what really has me concerned is the fact that 61% of people aged 18-24 reported getting sunburned in the past year. People in that age group tend to be more willing to tan than older adults, likely because the long-term damage they're doing is 10 to 20 years away from showing up (well, that and the mistaken, lingering belief that a tan is healthy and pale skin is unattractive).
Sun Safety Essentials
Here are some basic points to keep in mind before you venture out to shop for sunscreens and before you slather it on:

* Application
* You must apply sunscreen liberally on all parts of your body that will see daylight! A study published in the Archives of Dermatology (October 2002, pages 1,319-1,325) said, "Sunscreen users are only applying 50 percent of the recommended amount, so they are only receiving 50 percent of the SPF protection." Because of the need for liberal application, expensive sunscreens can be dangerous to your skin's health. After all, how likely are you to liberally apply a sunscreen from Lancome that costs $48 or, even more absurdly, a sunscreen from La Prairie that costs $170 for 1 ounce?
* There are brilliantly formulated sunscreens in all price ranges, but because how you use it is so important, expensive absolutely doesn't mean better in the world of sun protection.

* Tanning Isn't Pretty
* There is no such thing as a safe tan, whether it is from the sun or a tanning booth. Even if you tan slowly without burning (what many people refer to as "developing a base tan"), the damage is hazardous to the health and long-term appearance of your skin. What gets put on the back burner, so to speak, is that sunburn at any age (or latitude, meaning you're not safer in Boston than you would be in Orlando) increases the risk for melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.
* UVB radiation is the sun's burning ray and has an immediate, harmful impact on skin. Damage from UVB rays takes place within the very first minute (yes, 60 seconds) of walking outside.
* UVA rays are the sun's silent killers. You don't feel them but they are the primary cause of skin cancer, wrinkles, and a weakened immune system.
* Even on a cloudy or hazy day, the sun's rays are present and impacting the skin. Sun damage is about naked skin seeing daylight.
* Sitting in the shade or wearing a hat only protects against a portion of the sun's rays. Plus, other surrounding surfaces such as water, cement, and grass reflect the rays from the ground to your skin giving you a double whammy of exposure.

* Getting Wet
* If you're swimming or perspiring, you must wear a water-resistant sunscreen which provides 40 (labeled as "water-resistant") to 80 (labeled as "very water-resistant") minutes of protection before you need to reapply it to maintain a sufficient level of protection. Sunscreens labeled as "waterproof" are not really waterproof (which is why the FDA is urging manufacturers to stop using this term). No sunscreen is "waterproof." If you do not reapply a sunscreen after swimming, perspiring, or toweling off, expect sun damage up to and including sunburn.

* SPF by the Numbers
* According to the FDA, the U.S. regulatory body that monitors SPF ratings, a product's SPF (sun protection factor) number tells you how long you can stay in the sun before getting burned. To find out your own personal SPF number click here: Your Personal SPF: Determining Your Number

* UVA vs. UVB
* SPF is crucial, but it is only a measurement regarding sunburn (UVB) rays. It is dangerous for your skin to not have UVA protection and many sunscreens do not have ingredients that can provide true full-spectrum (both UVA and UVB) coverage. In most countries, including the U.S. and Canada, there are no numbers to tell you about protection from UVA radiation. For that protection you have to check the active ingredient list to see if either zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, avobenzone (which may also be listed as Parsol 1789 or butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane), Mexoryl SX, or Tinosorb (Tinosorb is only available in products sold outside the U.S.). If one of those isn't part of the active ingredient list (it doesn't count if it is just part of the regular or "other" ingredients) you are not applying adequate UVA protection and that is dangerous for your skin.
* The SPF number does not tell you anything about a product's quality. The SPF number is just a time limit number. A sunscreen rated SPF 2 blocks about 50% of UVB rays; an SPF 10 filters out about 85% of UVB rays; an SPF 15 stops about 95%; and an SPF 30 stops about 97%. An SPF that's higher than 30 does not provide any more UV protection, it just offers more time that you can stay in the sun without burning.
* Even if the SPF number on your sunscreen's label is an SPF 50, it still has limitations and can let approximately 3% of UV rays penetrate your skin. This explains why you still might get some color after prolonged exposure to the sun despite slathering sunscreen on your skin and reapplying as directed.
* As a general rule it is best to apply sunscreen at least 15 to 20 minutes before sun exposure. This gives the sunscreen time to absorb and to spread over and into the uppermost layers of skin. You never want to wait until you get to your destination to apply sunscreen.

* Ouch!
* Getting sunburned is bad enough, but what you may not know is that sunburn continues to develop for 12 to 24 hours after the initial burn takes place! Treat sunburn the way you would treat any other burn. Do not cover it with thick salves (greasy, balm-like moisturizers are the worst). These will trap the heat and cause more damage. Get the skin in contact with cool (not cold or icy) water or pure aloe vera immediately (do not put ice directly on the skin—that's too much cold and can cause a different kind of burn). Then keep applying the cool water or pure aloe vera on and off for several hours. You may also want to take an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory, such as aspirin, to reduce pain and swelling. If you are unsure of which medication to take, consult your physician.

* Special Concerns
* If you are using AHA, BHA, Retin-A, Renova, Differin, or any topical pharmaceutical retinoid, it can make your skin more vulnerable to sun damage due to the surface exfoliation and changes (removing the top layer of sun-damaged skin) caused by using these products. If you are not being diligent about sun protection, your skin is even more at risk for sun damage and sunburn, even with minimal sun exposure.

* Adding Up Different Sun Products
* If you are using more than one product that contains sunscreen, the two sunscreens do not add up to one SPF number. In other words, an SPF 8 and an SPF 15 do not add up to an SPF 23. Though you would absolutely get an increased SPF value for protection (and layering isn't a bad idea at all), there is still no way of knowing what that increased protection would be. If you want to count on getting an SPF 30's worth of protection, then that is the number you should look for in one product.

* For the Kids
* If you have babies or small children, sunscreen protection should be of primary concern. Their delicate skin is even more sensitive to the sun's damaging energy. Regardless of the claim on the label, SPF formulations don't differ in any way because of the age of the intended user. Of greater concern than the cute packaging on kids' products is that the formulation is best for a child's sensitive skin. That means you should choose one that contains only pure titanium dioxide and/or zinc oxide as the active ingredient. These mineral-based active ingredients have almost no chance of causing a reaction on skin and they pose a low risk of casing stinging if the product inadvertently gets into your child's eyes (think how often kids use their hands to wipe at their eye area).

* The Only Safe Tan
* If you're determined to get a tan, the only safe way to do it is with self-tanning products such as Paula's Choice Almost the Real Thing Self-Tanning Gel or the many other options available at the drugstore, from Neutrogena to L'Oreal or Coppertone. You can also go to self-tanning booths offered in many tanning parlors (such as Mystic Tan®) that spray a uniform layer of self-tanner from head to toe. The results can be very impressive, assuming you follow all the pre-spray directions. Your self-tan can be enhanced with carefully-applied bronzing products (creams, gels, and powders).

Sunscreens

The sunscreens on the list below are divided into options for skin types, product type, and, where applicable, Point-of-Sale. You'll find inexpensive options from the drugstore and mail order companies like Avon as well as pricier but still worthwhile options sold at the department store and in beauty emporiums like Sephora. Every SPF-rated product on the list not only provides sufficient UVA-protection as discussed above, but the skin-care products with sunscreen contain antioxidants and other ingredients that help boost skin's defenses in the presence of sunlight.

Antioxidants are a key component of a well-formulated sunscreen, especially for the face, hands, and chest that get hammered by the sun more than just about any other part of the body. When skin isn't damaged by the sun's rays (which generate free-radical damage), it contains a natural supply of antioxidants. With ongoing, unprotected exposure to the sun these vital elements are depleted and don't regenerate. Supplying your skin with antioxidants in a product you leave on provides your skin with what it needs to function normally and "act younger".

Simply put, not using a sunscreen with antioxidants is cheating your skin for no good reason. Why settle for just sun protection when sunscreen plus antioxidants can help your skin defend itself much better?

Note: for ongoing reviews of sunscreens from over 250 cosmetic lines, visit my extensive database of product reviews at www.Beautypedia.com.

Reminder: The list of products below is current as this report is prepared for publication online. Cosmetic companies can and often do discontinue products at their discretion. Please contact the cosmetic company in question if you're unable to find a particular product on this list.

* Best Sunscreens for Normal to Dry Skin:
* At the Drugstore:
* Alba Botanica Facial Sunscreen SPF 20 ($9.95 for 4 ounces)
* Alba Botanica Kids Sunscreen SPF 30+ ($9.95 for 4 ounces)
* Alba Botanica Sport Sunscreen SPF 30+ ($9.95 for 4 ounces) Eucerin Everyday Protection Body Lotion SPF 15
* Aveeno Continuous Protection Sunblock Lotion SPF 30, for Face ($10.49 for 3 ounces)
* Eucerin Everyday Protection Body Lotion SPF 15 ($10.29 for 13.5 ounces)
* Kiss My Face Sun Screen SPF 18 ($11.95 for 4 ounces)
* Jason Natural Sunbrellas Active Sunblock SPF 40 ($11 for 4 ounces)
* Jason Natural Sunbrellas Family Sunblock SPF 36 ($9.49 for 4 ounces)
* Jason Natural Sunbrellas Kids Sunbock SPF 46 ($11.49 for 4 ounces)
* Kiss My Face Face Factor Face + Neck SPF 30 ($11.95 for 2 ounces)
* Neutrogena Active Breathable Sunblock SPF 30 ($9.99 for 4 ounces)
* Neutrogena Age Shield Face Sunblock SPF 55 ($10.99 for 4 ounces)
* Neutrogena Ultra Soft Hydrating Sunblock SPF 45 ($13.99 for 6 ounces)

* At the Department/Specialty Store:
* Cellex-C Sunshade SPF 30+ ($45 for 2 ounces)
* Clarins Sun Care Cream Ultra Protection SPF 30, for Children and Sun Sensitive Skin ($27 for 4 ounces)
* Clinique Sun SPF 30 Body Cream ($20 for 5 ounces)
* Clinique Sun SPF 50 Body Cream ($20 for 5 ounces)
* Clinique Sun SPF 30 Face Cream ($17.50 for 1.7 ounces)
* Clinique Sun SPF 50 Face Cream ($17.50 for 1.7 ounces)
* DDF Moisturizing Photo-Age Protection SPF 30 ($32 for 4 ounces)
* fresh Sunshield Face and Body SPF 30 ($48 for 5.1 ounces)
* Good Skin All Bright Moisturizing Sunscreen SPF 30 ($12 for 1.7 ounces)
* MD Skincare by Dr. Dennis Gross Powerful Sun Protection SPF 30 Sunscreen Lotion ($42 for 5 ounces)
* MD Skincare by Dr. Dennis Gross Powerful Sun Protection SPF 30 Sunscreen Packettes ($42 for 60 packets)
* MD Skincare by Dr. Dennis Gross Powerful Sun Protection SPF 45 Sunscreen Cream ($42 for 4.2 ounces)
* Nu Skin Sunbright Body Block SPF 30 ($15.20 for 3.4 ounces)
* Nu Skin Sunbright Body Block SPF 15 ($15.20 for 3.4 ounces)Paula's Choice Ultra-Light Sunscreen Spray Lotion SPF 55
* Paula's Choice Extra Care Moisturizing Sunscreen SPF 30+ for Normal to Dry Skin ($14.95 for 4.2 ounces)
* Paula's Choice Ultra Light Weightless Finish SPF 30 Sunscreen Spray for All Skin Types ($15.95 for 4 ounces)
* Paula's Choice Pure Mineral Sunscreen SPF 15 for Normal to Very Dry Skin ($15.95 for 6 ounces)
* Paula's Choice Ultra-Light Sunscreen Spray Lotion SPF 55 for All Skin Types ($15.95 for 4 ounces)
* Peter Thomas Roth Uber-Dry Sunscreen Cream SPF 30 ($26 for 4.2 ounces)
* Peter Thomas Roth Oil-Free Sunblock SPF 30 ($26 for 4.2 ounces)

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* Best Sunscreens for Normal to Oily Skin:
* Neutrogena Age Shield Sunblock SPF 30
* At the Drugstore:
* Jason Natural Sunbrellas Sun Care Complete Block Spray SPF 26 ($9.75 for 4 ounces)
* Neutrogena Active Breathable Sunblock SPF 30 ($9.99 for 4 ounces) SPF 45 ($10.69 for 4 ounces)
* Neutrogena Age Shield Face Sunblock SPF 55 ($10.99 for 4 ounces)
* Neutrogena Age Shield Sunblock SPF 30 ($9.99 for 4 ounces)
* Neutrogena Age Shield Sunblock SPF 45 ($9.99 for 4 ounces)
* Olay Age Transform Intensive UV Defense Serum SPF 15 ($10.99 for 5.9 ounces)

* At the Department/Specialty Store:
* Clinique Sun SPF 15 Face/Body Cream ($20 for 5 ounces)Clinique Sun SPF 15 Face/Body Cream
* DDF Matte Finish Photo-Age Protection SPF 30 ($32 for 4 ounces)
* Good Skin All Bright Moisturizing Sunscreen SPF 30 ($12 for 1.7 ounces)
* Good Skin All Bright Oil-Free Sunscreen SPF 30 ($12 for 1.7 ounces)
* Mary Kay SPF 30 Sunscreen ($14 for 4 ounces)
* Paula's Choice Extra Care Non-Greasy Sunscreen SPF 45 for Normal to Oily/Combination Skin ($14.95 for 5 ounces)
* Paula's Choice Ultra-Light Sunscreen Spray Lotion SPF 55 ($15.95 for 4 ounces)
* Paula's Choice Ultra-Light Weightless Finish SPF 30 Sunscreen Spray for All Skin Types ($15.95 for 4 ounces)
* Paula's Choice Essential Non-Greasy Sunscreen for Normal to Oily/Combination Skin ($14.95 for 5 ounces)
* Peter Thomas Roth Uber-Dry Sunscreen Cream ($26 for 4.2 ounces)
* SkinCeuticals Physical UV Defense SPF 30 ($34 for 3 ounces)
* SkinMedica Solar Care Daily Sun Protection SPF 20 ($33.15 for 2 ounces)

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Paula's Choice Pure Mineral Sunscreen SPF 15

* Best Sunscreens rated SPF 15 of Greater for Sensitive Skin:
* Alba Botanica Aloe Vanilla Mineral Sunscreen SPF 18 ($9.95 for 4 ounces)
* Avon Moisture Therapy Mineral Sunscreen Cream with SPF 28 ($9.99 for 3.4 ounces)
* Jason Natural Fragrance-Free Hand & Body Lotion SPF 15 ($12.99 for 8.5 ounces)
* Obagi Nu-Derm Physical UV Block SPF 32 ($40 for 2 ounces)
* Paula's Choice Pure Mineral Sunscreen SPF 15 ($15.95 for 6 ounces)
* Physician's Formula Sun Shield for Faces Extra Sensitive Skin SPF 25 ($8.95 for 4 ounces)
* Neutrogena Pure & Free Baby Sunblock Stick SPF 60+ with PureScreen ($8.99 for 0.47 ounce)
* SkinCeuticals Physical UV Defense SPF 30 ($34 for 3 ounces)

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Foundations

* Best *Foundations with Sunscreen for Normal to Dry Skin:
* Revlon Age Defying Makeup with Botafirm SPF 15At the Drugstore:
* Cover Girl AquaSmooth Makeup SPF 15 ($9.99)
* L'Oreal HIP Flawless Liquid Makeup SPF 15 ($13)
* Maybelline Instant Age Rewind Custom Face Perfector Cream Compact Foundation SPF 18 ($7.99)
* Revlon Age Defying Makeup with Botafirm SPF 15 ($13.99)
* Revlon ColorStay Makeup with Softflex for Normal to Dry Skin SPF 15 ($12.99)
* Revlon New Complexion One Step Compact Makeup SPF 15 ($12.99)

* At the Department/Specialty Store:
* Chanel Mat Lumiere Long Lasting Soft Matte Makeup SPF 15 ($54)
* Cle de Peau Beaute Refining Fluid Foundation SPF 24 ($115)
* Clinique Repairware Anti-Aging Makeup SPF 15 ($28.50)
* Dior DiorSkin Compact SPF 20 ($41)
* Estee Lauder Resilience Lift Extreme Ultra Firming Creme Compact Makeup SPF 15 ($34.50)
* Giorgio Armani Designer Shaping Cream Foundation ($65)
* Guerlain Terracotta Ultimate Bronze SPF 15 ($42.50)
* Lancome Absolue BX Makeup Absolute Replenishing Radiant makeup SPF 18 ($57)Tarte ReCreate Anti-Aging Foundation with Wrinkle Rewind Technology SPF 15
* M.A.C. Select SPF 15 Moistureblend ($29)
* M.A.C. Studio Sculpt SPF 15 Foundation ($28)
* M.A.C. Studio Stick Foundation SPF 15 ($29)
* Paula's Choice All Bases Covered Foundation SPF 15 ($14.95)
* Prescriptives AnyWear Multi-Purpose Makeup Stick SPF 15 ($35)
* Prescriptives Flawless Skin Total Protection Makeup SPF 15 ($39.50)
* Quo Cosmetics Optical Illusion Foundation SPF 15 ($20)
* Shiseido Dual Balancing Foundation SPF 17 ($37.50)
* Shiseido Stick Foundation SPF 15 ($37)
* Tarte ReCreate Anti-Aging Foundation with Wrinkle Rewind Technology SPF 15 ($37)
* Tarte Smooth Operator Oil-Free Foundation with SPF 20 ($35)

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Almay TLC Truly Lasting Color 16 Hour Makeup SPF 15

* Best *Foundations with Sunscreen for Normal to Oily Skin:
* At the Drugstore:
* Almay Nearly Naked Liquid Makeup SPF 15 ($12.99)
* Almay TLC Truly Lasting Color 16 Hour Makeup SPF 15 ($12.99)
* Boots No7 Stay Perfect Foundation SPF 15 ($13.99)
* Cover Girl AquaSmooth Makeup SPF 15 ($9.99)
* L'Oreal HIP Flawless Liquid Makeup SPF 15 ($13)
* L'Oreal True Match Super Blendable Makeup SPF 17 ($10.95)
* Revlon Age Defying Makeup with Botafirm SPF 15 ($13.99)
* Revlon Beyond Natural Skin Matching Makeup SPF 15 ($12.99)
* Revlon ColorStay Active Light Makeup SPF 25 ($12.99)
* Revlon New Complexion One Step Compact Makeup SPF 15 ($12.99)

* At the Department/Specialty Store:
* Chanel Mat Lumiere Long Lasting Soft Matte Makeup SPF 15 ($54)
* Clarins Truly Matte Foundation SPF 15 ($37.50)
* Cle de Peau Beaute Refining Fluid Foundation SPF 24 ($115)
* Clinique Even Better Makeup SPF 15 ($24.50)
* Clinique Superbalanced Compact Makeup SPF 20 ($28)
* Dior DiorSkin Compact SPF 20 ($41)
* Estee Lauder Nutritious Vita-Mineral Loose Powder Makeup SPF 15 ($33.50)
* Guerlain Terracotta Ultimate Bronze SPF 15 ($42.50)
* Jane Iredale PurePressed Minerals SPF 18 ($48)
* Illuminare Ultimate All Day Foundation/Concealer Matte Finish Sunscreen Makeup SPF 21 ($27)
* Lancome Absolue BX Makeup Absolute Replenishing Radiant Makeup SPF 18 ($57)
* M.A.C. Studio Sculpt SPF 15 Foundation ($28)
* M.A.C. Studio Stick Foundation SPF 15 ($29)
* Paula's Choice Best Face Forward Foundation SPF 15 ($14.95)
* Prescriptives AnyWear Multi-Purpose Makeup Stick SPF 15 ($35)
* Quo Cosmetics Optical Illusion Foundation SPF 15 ($20)
* Shiseido Stick Foundation SPF 15 ($37.50)
* Shiseido Sun Protection Liquid Foundation SPF 42 ($33.50)
* Tarte Smooth Operator Oil-Free Foundation with SPF 20 ($35)
* The Body Shop Flawless Skin Protecting Foundation SPF 25 ($25)

*Note: Foundations with sunscreen appearing on the lists for normal to dry and normal to oily skin are suitable for all skin types.

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Neutrogena Healthy Skin Glow Sheers SPF 30
Tinted Moisturizers

* Best Tinted Moisturizers with Sunscreen:
* At the Drugstore:
* Boots No7 Soft & Sheer Tinted Moisturizer SPF 15 ($11.99)
* Neutrogena Healthy Skin Enhancer SPF $20 ($11.99)
* Neutrogena Healthy Skin Glow Sheers SPF 30 ($12.79)

* At the Department/Specialty Store:Paula's Choice Barely There Sheer Matte Tint SPF 20
* Aveda Inner Light Tinted Moisture SPF 15 ($26)
* Bobbi Brown SPF 15 Tinted Moisturizer ($40)
* Clinique Almost Makeup SPF 15 ($20.50)
* Estee Lauder DayWear Plus Multi-Protection Anti-Oxidant Moisturizer Sheer Tint Release Formula SPF 15 for All Skin Types ($38.50)
* Estee Lauder DayWear Plus Multi-Protection Tinted Moisturizer SPF 15 ($35)
* Laura Mercier Illuminating Tinted Moisturizer SPF 20 ($42)
* Paula's Choice Barely There Sheer Matte Tint SPF 20 ($14.95)

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Pressed Powders

* Best Pressed Powders with Sunscreen:
* Avon Anew Beauty Age-Transforming Pressed Powder SPF 15 ($12) Avon Anew Beauty Age-Transforming Pressed Powder SPF 15
* Clinique Almost Powder Makeup SPF 15 ($22.50)
* Dior DiorSkin Forever Compact Flawless & Moist Extreme Wear Makeup SPF 25 ($42)
* Paula's Choice Healthy Finish Pressed Powder SPF 15 ($14.95)
* Prescriptives: Flawless Skin Total Protection Powder SPF 15 ($30)
* Shiseido Compact Foundation SPF 15 ($37.50)
* Shiseido STM Smoothing Compact Foundation SPF 34 ($25.50)
* Shiseido Sun Protection Compact Foundation SPF 34 ($25.50)
* Shiseido Pureness Matifying Compact Oil-Free SPF 16 ($20)

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Lip Balms
Paula's Choice Moisturizing Lipscreen SPF 15

* Best Lip Balms with Sunscreen:
* B. Kamins, Chemist Lip Balm SPF 20 ($19 for 0.53 ounce)
* Blistex Clear Advance SPF 30 ($2.19 for 0.15 ounce)
* Jane Iredale Lip Drink SPF 15 ($11.60 for 0.15 ounce)
* Mary Kay Lip Protector Sunscreen SPF 15 ($7.50 for 0.16 ounce)
* MD Skincare by Dr. Dennis Gross Powerful Sun Protection SPF 25 Lip Balm ($18 for 0.25 ounce)
* Paula's Choice Moisturizing Lipscreen SPF 15 ($8.95 for 0.16 ounce)

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9 comments:

sallymandy said...

Good reminders. Thank you. Now that my sunspots are popping out on my arms and chest--the places I used to get the most sunburns as a teenager--I'm doubly careful to get the stuff on my daughter. It truly does add up over the years.

And--I really have no idea what the answer to the health care issues in our country are, but we've just had a $2100 emergency room bill that is not covered by our catastrophic-only health insurance (for which we pay $750 a month). The orthopedic surgeon's bill, for 20 minutes of advice giving and two tiny snips of his scissors, was $1100. No, I don't have an answer, but I hope somebody with more know-how than I have does!

Thanks FS. Good post.

Frugal Scholar said...

@sallymandy--erghh--that bill. Have you read the New Yorker article? My daughter is obsessed with sunscreen. She's hoping that she will be wrinkle-free later.

Duchesse said...

Don't you wonder why anyone would spend $20 for B. Kamins lip gloss when they could get Blistex for less than $3?

Reprogramming myself about how attractive a modest suntan looks is probably the hardest aesthetic revision I've ever had to make. The last tan I had was about 7 years ago... was working in Spain (with a group of tour guides) and did not want to be defenseless against the sun, or look so white- so got a tanning salon tan. Dadgummit, I looked good.

My mother lived in FL. In her mid-80s she allowed herself to tan, saying "At this point, who cares?" and she did look so much 'healthier' to me.

Imogen Lamport said...

Excellent post - I wear sunscreen with both UVA and UVB protection daily.

WE are lucky in Australia - for something to be labelled as a sunscreen it has to be broad spectrum and cover both ray types (our FDA is much stricter than the US one). So we have had these sunscreens for many years now.

I too have tried Paula's skincare and find them excellent, but I do love that she lists lots of other brands too.

Frugal Scholar said...

@Duchesse--I wonder stuff like that all the time!! But you're right about re-programming. ALL my students use tanning beds.

@Imogen--Hmmm. Maybe I'll have to visit Australia to buy some sunscreen. I've been looking for an excuse for such a long trip!

Funny about Money said...

Wow! What a list!

I was amazed to learn, some time back, that there's no need to get the higher SPFs. Equally amazing is the price some people will pay for a designer label on a bottle of the same stuff that comes from Walgreen's.

It's also useful to know that combining a sunblock with makeup that contains sunblocker does nothing to increase the SPF. If you use a sunblock cream as your moisturizer, there's no need to seek out makeup with any SPF at all.

Diane Rehm (sp) had the author of the New Yorker on NPR a couple of days ago, BTW.

FB @ FabulouslyBroke.com said...

Theres something out there (new development) called HELIOPLEX that is also a sunscreen ingredient.

Paula has advocated helioplex in one of the articles I read too.

My SPF 55 has it. But I need to buy a moisturizer or something with SPF 30 in it for everyday..

Normally, I just wear a hat because I sweat a LOT and the sunscreen always rubs off

Shelley said...

I worry about skin cancer as my Mom told me I had a couple of 'good' sunburns as a baby. She always remarked how frightened she was and then how quickly I healed. (This makes her sound like a really bad mother, not at all the case! They just didn't know much back then...) I worked hard at tanning all my life until my 40s when I moved to England. It's too cold up here to sunbathe and I'm too frugal to pay for a tanning bed. I confess that I did try that, but decided the result wasn't worth the expense. No point in trying to tan in the two weeks you're on holiday, not really. For a long time I took to the first 2/3's of the adage: Lose it, tone it, tan it. I'm still that way inclined but graduating towards the idea of 'cover it'...

Miss ELLE said...

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